Tip #11

From the moment you first set out to write a story for publication, you become a public figure, a celebrity. People applaud you, fawn over you, tell you how wonderfully clever you are.

Most people can see themselves writing a book someday. They relate to you. They want to be you.

But that will end quickly if you are unlikable. It will hurt your sales, too.

It doesn’t matter that you’re not presenting your book at that moment. You’re representing YOU, the writer, all the time. ALL THE TIME.

Tip 11

 

Tip #10

Publishing is a business. They want to make money. No-brainer, right?

Yet, I hear lots of people say they can’t get a publisher. Or they write better than so-and-so, but can’t get a representative.

My first advice is to look at your manuscript. Is it grammatically correct? Does it have lots of spelling mistakes? Do all your characters sound the same? Is it descriptive?

It may have a good story, but if it take a lot of time to clean up, it’s a bigger investment than a story that’s already clean and a little bit of a lesser story.

The publisher has to be able to make money on YOUR manuscript and wages are the most expensive part of any business. The longer it takes to get your story ready for market, the more expensive it is to publish, the less money your publisher makes.

Tip 10